Schmidt and Nosek, 2010, Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, Implicit (and explicit) racial attitudes barely changed during the campaign and early presidency of Barack Obama

citation

Schmidt, K., & Nosek, B. A. (2010). Implicit (and explicit) racial attitudes barely changed during the campaign and early presidency of Barack Obama. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology. [Request paper]

Abstract

As a high-status, omnipresent Black exemplar, Barack Obama and his rise to the presidency of the United States may have induced a cultural shift in implicit racial attitudes, much like controlled exposures to positive Black and negative White exemplars have done in the laboratory (Dasgupta & Greenwald, 2001). With a very large, heterogeneous sample collected daily for 2.5 years prior to, during and after the 2008 Election season (N = 479,405), we observed very little evidence of systematic change in implicit and explicit racial attitudes overall, within subgroups, or for particular notable dates. Malleability of racial attitudes – implicit or explicit – may be conditional on more features than the mere presence of high-status counter-stereotypic exemplars.

Study Demo

Web demonstration of study - Data compiled from the "standard" demonstration race IAT (select Race IAT from list)

Study Materials

Supplement: Analyses of explicit racial attitudes over time paralleling the implicit attitude analyses reported in the article

Data

Day-by-day data from study reported in the article is available for download at Brian Nosek's Dataverse.

 

Kathleen Schmidt, Brian Nosek